Videos

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  • This is a short video of a Sooty Grouse with its chicks in the alpine in Juneau, Alaska
  • Hens with small juveniles may fluff body feathers, droop wings, fan tails, cluck loudly, hiss, and fly at and strike an intruder, or attempt to lead the intruder away (so-called 'distraction display'). Intruders so attacked include a black bear (Ursus americanus; Sullivan 1979), a wolf (Canis lupus; J. Hines pers. comm.), humans, and dogs. Solid clucking (and total response) weakens with increasing age of chicks (Fig. 29). Though common in captivity, no intersibling aggression was noted in wild juveniles to about 12 d of age (Zwickel 1967a). From: Zwickel, Fred C. and James F. Bendell. 2005. Blue Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/015

  • Over the years I have seen a few interesting aggressive actions by swallows in Alaska.
  • This video illustrates three of them.
  • The first one concerns Tree Swallows -- at a nest four swallows were entering the nest and interacting with each other.
  • What was happening might be explained by http://www.jstor.org/stable/1368876?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
  • Black Oystercatchers are common nesting birds along most of the southern coastal areas of Alaska.
  • They usually nest on small islands but in some areas, such as Glacier Bay, they may nest along the rocky mainland shores.
  • The female typically lays one to three eggs.
  • This nest has three eggs so the "clutch" is complete.
  • Both sexes incubate. At first mostly female, but male equalizes duty later in incubation period. Eggs are covered 90–98% of time.
  • Parental feeding of offspring extends well after chicks develop independent flight.
  • One parent guards or broods chicks while other parent forages.
  • For more information about Black Oystercatchers look at Andres, Brad A. and Gary A. Falxa. 1995. Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/155
  • This female Lincoln's Sparrow is incubating her eggs in Juneau, Alaska on June 27, 2015
  • Two of the eggs hatched and she is feeding the chicks on July 4, 2015
  • For more information on Lincoln's Sparrows look at Ammon, Elisabeth M. 1995. Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/191
  • This video can be used for comparison to the one on geese.
  • For Mallards only the hen takes care of the kids for Geese both parents take care of them.
  • For more information you can look at Drilling, Nancy, Rodger Titman and Frank Mckinney. 2002. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/658
  • In North America, the Mallard is the most abundant duck species.
  • Majority of pairs form on wintering grounds, far in advance of breeding.
  • Female begins searching for a nest site within 5–10 d of establishing home range.
  • Pair searches by making low circling flights over the area, usually in evening; alight and female walks into cover; male walks nearby or waits outside cover. Female makes several scrapes during days before first egg laid.
  • Hen also pulls and bends tall vegetation over to conceal herself and nest. After incubation begins, plucks down from breast to line nest and cover eggs.
  • Ducklings usually depart on morning after hatching, depending on weather.
  • Only hen cares for ducklings. Ducklings feed themselves without assistance.
  • Young ducks able to fly and independent at approximately 52–70 d.
  • How do the youngsters learn how and when to migrate?
  • Learn local area by accompanying other birds; may stay in natal area throughout autumn until migration. Flying juveniles join adult flocks in autumn to migrate; subordinate to adults their first winter.

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