Videos

These videos are free to use for educational purposes. To download them click on vimeo on the bottom right. To view them full screen click on the symbol next to the HD at the bottom. The bullets can be copied and pasted into a word document.

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  • Perhaps the value of this video would be to concentrate on how the dipper uses its wings to move underwater.
  • Also thinking about the silvery sheen around the dipper and doing some research as to why this occurs.
  • What adaptions does the American Dipper have for diving underwater?
  • The next video titled "Several Dipper Dives at Half Speed" more clearly shows the bird feeding on the aquatic insects residing on the underside of the woody debris.
  • This is my interpretation that the eagle is stepping aside to allow its mate to have some food.
  • There is a mated pair that lives and hunts in this area and it appears that they are male and female.
  • Female Bald Eagles are larger than males so when they stand together you can usually see the size differences.
  • This is a good example of the value of coho salmon carcasses later in the year.
  • To learn more about eagle pairs and their nesting habits look at Raising an Eaglet (Bald Eagle) by Bob Armstrong and Marge Hermans
  • This video of an American Dipper diving and feeding shows it turning over pieces of wood and grabbing the aquatic insects residing on the underside of the wood.
  • Notice the coho salmon towards the back of the pool. This video was taken on November 15 so in this stream this would be the tail end of the run.
  • Coho salmon typically stay in the stream after spawning until their death.
  • Think about the reason why the dipper is concentrating on feeding within the pile of debris.
  • What would be some of the benefits for other creatures of coho spawning just before winter sets in?
  • Since this is the end of the salmon spawning season many of the aquatic insects that normally live within the gravel areas would have been displaced by the spawning salmon.
  • Since salmon do not spawn within woody debris piles this would be a safe place for aquatic insects to live.
  • Also some aquatic insects prefer woody debris.
  • Coho salmon carcasses are often frozen within the stream as winter approaches. During our occasional winter thaws the carcasses then become available to other creatures at a time when food is scarce.
  • This is another example of the value of coho salmon carcasses becoming available as winter approaches.
  • It would be interesting to do some research as to why ravens initially appear to be afraid of their food.
  • The interactions between the two ravens is also interesting.
  • These flowers have five staminodes forming semicircles of stalked pseudonectaries each tipped with a yellowish glistening knob.
  • Although they are dry and rewardless, they attract many insects that probe at the tiny knobs.
  • What would be a benefit of having nectaries in which the insects received no benefits?
  • This means the plant still gets cross pollinated without having to produce anything to attract the insects.
  • To view the flower better and see the Thrips with pollen go to photos and type in fringed grass-of-parnassus in the search box.
  • This is a good example of how the dipper turns over fairly large pieces of wood underwater.
  • For this video I used a 4+ close-up filter on the GoPro camera which allowed for more detail when the bird was close to the camera.
  • This would also be a good video in which to discuss the value of woody debris for aquatic insects and as an area for dippers to feed in.
  • By slowing the video to 1/4 speed it also allows one to see this type of behavior better.
  • This video was taken in an ice covered pond in the Juneau area.
  • It shows how a beaver swims underwater.
  • Notice how it only uses its hind feet for swimming.
  • In winter beavers will usually swim out of their lodge under the ice to a stash of food and bring it back into the lodge to eat.
  • All this is done without coming to the water surface.
  • In this case, however, the beaver did surface through the fairly thin ice as shown in the last photo.
  • To learn about beavers and their habits look at Beavers by the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska
  • This is an example of a young Dolly Varden contemplating a meal of caddisflies.
  • You will notice that the fish has a bulging belly so it probably does not have room for much more.
  • I have observed these fish grabbing a caddisfly by the head and shaking its case off before swallowing it.

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