Videos

These videos are free to use for educational purposes. To download them click on vimeo on the bottom right. To view them full screen click on the symbol next to the HD at the bottom. The bullets can be copied and pasted into a word document.

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  • Canada Geese Feeding on Eel Grass shows a pair of geese eating eel grass on May 5, 2019 in Juneau, Alaska.
  • Of interest in watching this pair feed for about an hour one goose would normally stand watch while the other fed. After awhile they would change duties. 
  • This is probably a mated pair of geese which will move to their nesting grounds soon. 
  • For information on Eel Grass go to https://www.naturebob.com/what-comes-eel-grass and look at the bullets of information under the video.
  • A Minks Place is an area in Juneau, Alaska where an American Mink lives.
  • It is about 200 feet from saltwater and it appears to enter and leave several underground places in about a 20 foot square area. 
  • I have been using a gamecam in the area for about a month now. Originally it appeared to be a place frequented by River Otters.
  • River Otters still occasionally visit the area.
  • For about 3 weeks now the mink have only brought crabs into the holes in the ground. No other food has been documented. 
  • The video just shows a few selected clips and is mean't to be used as a basis for discussion. 
  • Many thoughts could be discussed: for example Do otters and mink tolerate each other? Why are they only bringing in crabs? What species of crab do they appear to be?
  • Bald Eagle Catches and Eats a Crab shows an eagle capturing a crab at low tide in Juneau, Alaska on May 6, 2019.
  • Of interest is at the minus tides I often see eagles capturing and eating crabs. They seem to not eat the legs but concentrate on the body meat and possibly stomach contents.
  • Since crabs can accumulate PSP in their stomachs I wonder if this has any effect on the eagles that eat them.
  • For information about crabs concentrating this toxin look at Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning in Alaska Facts and Discussion
  • Hudsonian Godwits shows the most of this species I have seen in the Juneau area.
  • I think in the video they were feeding on tube-dwelling amphipods.
  • About 19 of them occurred at the Eagle Beach State Park in early May 2019.
  • One of them was tagged and thanks to Gus van Vliet here is the documentation /sites/default/files/Just%20received%20word%20about%20where%20the%20bird%20had%20been%20banded.docx
  • Nils Warnock, the former Executive Director for Audubon Alaska, wrote in my Birds of Alaska book the following: "There are 53 shorebird species and subspecies that regularly occur in Alaska; 24 percent are deemed vulnerable or declining. One of these vulnerable species is the Hudsonian Godwit, a bird that migrates all the way from southern Chile to breed in Alaska. In its journey from Alaska to the southern tip of South America it faces threats from warming summers at the breeding grounds, loss of water and wetlands in the Midwest, the effects of deforestation in the Amazon, to disturbance at its wintering grounds in South America."

 

  • How do Ravens Find Sand Lance is a question I have often pondered.
  • Ravens and crows seem to be able to find sand lance better than Eagles and Gulls which appear to only get them only by stealing from the corvids.
  • Some birds can hear really well and I wonder if they can hear them under the sand.
  • Of interest is ravens often cock their head and then run off in a different direction and dig one up. 
  • Pacific Sand Lance are one of the most important forage fishes in Alaska to learn more about them look at Sand Lance A Review of Biology and Predator Relations and Annotated Bibliography
  • Black Oystercatchers eating Limpets shows how they get limpets off rocks.
  • This is one of the most common foods of these oystercatchers.
  • Their flat, side to side, bill is perfect for extracting the limpets.
  • For more information about Black Oystercatchers look at Andres, Brad A. and Gary A. Falxa. 1995. Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/155
  • When I have watched oystercatchers bringing food to their young limpets is the most common.
  • Dabbling Ducks includes most of the species seen in Alaska.
  • I have tried to show some of their behavior which could be used for discussion. 
  • I have not identified in the video the species you are seeing. 
  • This video could be used as an introduction to this group of birds and to learn how to identify the different species. 
  • Looking through a field guide might be fun to help identify the species. 
  • In addition most of the species have their songs and calls inserted to give you an idea about the variety.
  • I hope to add and update this video from time to time.
  • A Crab Spider interacts with shows it interacting with a flower fly, bumblebee, and another crab spider. In addition I saw it interacting with a ant. 
  • The spider appears to be a female Misumena vatia the Goldenrod Crab Spider.
  • This video was taken in Juneau, Alaska on May 16, 2019. The spider was hunting on a Nootka Lupine. 

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