Videos

These videos are free to use for educational purposes. To download them click on vimeo on the bottom right. To view them full screen click on the symbol next to the HD at the bottom. The bullets can be copied and pasted into a word document.

Only select a sub-category....
  • The beginning of this video shows an aerial view of the winter habitat of juvenile fish within this stream.
  • This video was taken on February 2, 2015 -- a winter without much snow.
  • The fish are concentrated in this one area that has numerous springs entering it.
  • The last part of the video shows a juvenile Dolly Varden resting at a spring area. Notice the sand bubbling up around it.
  • Most of the fish in the video are Dolly Varden and some coho salmon juveniles.
  • How can you tell these two species of fish apart?
  • For more information on juvenile salmonids in winter look at Winter, Ice, and Fish 2011, Brown, Hubert and Daly
  • This video shows a Dolly Varden sac fry that hatched just a few days ago.
  • It will live in the stream bottom among the rocks for about two months.
  • Then it will emerge from among the rocks and live in the stream and feed on aquatic insects.
  • What will it eat while it lives amongst the rocks?
     
  • This video shows an adult beaver with two of its kits feeding on alder leaves.
  • The kits are usually born within the lodge in spring.
  • They stay in the lodge for four or five weeks.
  • The mother nurses them for 6-10 weeks.
  • The kits begin to eat plant material when only 2.5 weeks old, while they are still drinking milk.
  • When born the kits weigh about one pound.
  • Several weeks after birth they may weight 6-9 pounds.
  • At this time they start to leave the lodge regularly.
  • For more information about beavers look at Beavers by the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska
  • This video was taken at Eagle Beach in Juneau on February 13, 2015.
  • The Black Turnstone is bathing in salt water.
  • The Rock Sandpiper is eating barnacles.
  • What food do you think the Barrow's Goldeneyes are getting in the surf?
  • These fish are very common in the streams, especially in Southeast Alaska.
  • They are called Coastrange Sculpins.
  • They can be very abundant -- one Southeast Stream was estimated to have 10,000 sculpins per half mile of stream.
  • They usually hide during the day and come out to eat at night.
  • What would be the advantage of feeding at night?
  • This female King Eider was found in Douglas, AK by local birders. It is an exciting find because they are considered accidental to very rare in Southeast Alaska.
  • Try to determine which one is the King Eider.
  • This video and photos were taken with a Panasonic FZ200 camera with a Raynox telephoto lens attached.
  • It was filmed in both the video and photo mode at the maximum extension in the digital mode which gives an equivalent of about 2,640 mm.
  • To learn more about this fairly inexpensive camera and Raynox lens look at An Evaluation of the Panasonic FZ-200 Camera
  • The threespine stickleback gets its name from the three spines located just in front of its dorsal fin.
  • Two forms of threespine stickleback occur in Alaska--marine and freshwater.
  • The marine form lives in the sea for most of its life, migrating into fresh water or estuaries in spring to breed.
  • Large numbers of the marine form have been caught up to 496 miles from shore in the Gulf of Alaska.
  • The freshwater form remains in streams, lakes, and ponds throughout its life.
  • The nesting habits of sticklebacks are fascinating -- try to learn about it.
  • Many creatures feed on stickleback -- such as cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, arctic terns, mergansers, great blue herons, kingfishers and river otters.
  • When caught by a predator what does the stickleback do in hopes of not being swallowed?
  • It erects and locks its spines in place, which sometimes prevents it from being swallowed.
  • This shows the various steps that Bald Eagles often use to obtain fish from the water surface.
  • For a full explanation of these events look at Eagle Acrobatics (Bald Eagle) by Bob Armstrong and Marge Hermans
  • The last part of the video shows an eagle taking its prey more from the preys standpoint.
  • How long do you think it takes Bald Eagles to develop these fairly precise hunting techniques?
  • How heavy of prey do you think Bald Eagles can carry?
  • Waterfowl in Alaska, such as these Barrow's Goldeneyes, often begin courting and mating in the mid of winter.
  • This video shows some of the courtship beginning in February.
  • What would be the advantage or reason for doing this so far from the nesting season?
  • For information on Waterfowl in winter look at Waterfowl in Winter by Bob Armstrong and Marge Hermans
  • This video was taken In February, 2015 in Juneau, Alaska.
  • The Barrow's Goldeneye was named for John Barrow (1764–1848) of the British Admiralty in recognition of his support of arctic exploration.
  • During winter in salt water they mostly feed on blue mussels and periwinkles.
  • How do you tell the Barrow's Goldeneye from the Common Goldeneye?

Pages